Anna Andrzhievskaia

 

Lives and works in St. Petersburg

 

The PRO ARTE School for Young Artists (2012–2013); The Saint Petersburg Stieglitz State Academy of Art and Design (2008–2014); a member of The Sever-7 (North-7) art group.

 

 

andrzhievskaia.tumblr.com

 

plug.ee/2017/05/o-molodom-rossiyskom-iskusstve-iz-pervyih-ust

 

aroundart.org/relation/andrzhievskaya-anna

 

www.colta.ru/articles/art/16515

 

www.instagram.com/andrzhievskaya

 

 

 

            QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

I was around 16 years old, when I first experienced the conscious urge to study art.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist?  How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

My studies at the academy gave me a lot of freedom and confidence. After monumental painting, different formats and new materials do not intimidate you. 

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

I am frequently asked to explain my works, and I always look forward to an interesting conversation. I usually ask the viewers to describe what they see, and the answers exceed my expectations.

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

My favorite artists are Niki de Saint Phalle, Matthew Barney and Louise Bourgeois. In cinema, my favorites are Gentlemen Broncos by Jared Hess and many of Harmony Korine’s films. I like the animated TV series 12 oz. Mouse and the Grimes music videos. As for places, it’s the Russian forest. 

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Graphikkabinett representative of your overall work?  Has your artistic method changed? 

I use such a wide assortment of tools and materials in my projects that my works exist, as it were, in parallel worlds, as if they have been done by different people. The selection that you have made for the Kabinett gives an apt illustration of my graphic works.  

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

Yes, this is my primary source of income.

 

What are you working on at the moment?  Do you have any plans for the near future?

I am gathering materials on the symbolism in the paintings of the Late Middles Ages and the Renaissance for a new series of works.

Maria Baturina

 

Lives and works in St. Petersburg

 

The Chto Delat School of Engaged Art (2014); The Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten, Amsterdam (2007); The Baltic Photo School (20030; The Higher School of Fashion and Applied Arts in St. Petersburg (1996).

 

 

marusyabaturina.wixsite.com/edelgauz

 

vimeo.com/marusyabaturina

 

artkommunalka.com/ru/content/prezentaciya-art-proekta-marii-baturinoy-diurnum

 

facebook.com/events/186265724875411

 

facebook.com/events/1448728455401396


 

 

            QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

From the age of five, but there have been long pauses in my creative activity.  I have not always been an artist.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist? How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

You can learn from practical training, from interaction with others, from your surroundings. Encounters with particular people (not necessarily artists), exhibitions, books and films – all of these have always played a huge role for me. 

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

I don’t have any problems with having to explain my works, as long as something remains in them that can’t be explained in words. An explanation can’t measure up to the work itself, which should, to some extent, remain unresolved and not reduced to a single correct interpretation. 

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

I can mention several writers who are important to me at the moment, but, of course, my list is considerably longer, and it is constantly changing. Chantal Akerman, Pedro Costa, W.G. Sebald, Boris Kupriyanov, Sophie Calle… As far as I am concerned, contemporary poetry is very important. I am not even going to mention concrete names, since it is often just particular lines or collocations that inspire me. The place is St. Petersburg.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Grafikkabinett representative of your overall work? Has your artistic method changed?

The selection consists exclusively of old works, and I don’t do such things any longer. Although I suppose there are motifs and “intonations” in them that are present in the works that I am doing now. I would like to think that my method has changed not only in a formal sense (I no longer do black-and-white hand printing) but also in its essence. But then, if these works didn’t exist, I probably would never have gotten into what I am doing now. 

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

No.

 

What are you working on at the moment?  Do you have any plans for the near future?

I am trying to do some things on the cusp of text and image.

Alexandra Gart

 

Lives and works in St. Petersburg

 

Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia (2005–2010); St. Petersburg Print Studio: a course in printmaking (2010– 2011); The PRO ARTE School for Young Artists (2015–2016) 

 

 

cargocollective.com/gart


art1.ru/2013/03/26/intimnyj-dnevnik-sashi-gart-6053

 

art1.ru/2013/03/06/trudy-i-dni-grafkaba-2970

 

gorod-plus.tv/blog/297.html


 

 

            QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

I have been taking part in exhibitions and pursuing a career in art more or less intensively since 2011.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist?  How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

Art courses in colleges and universities can at best teach certain skills, but even this is debatable. Skills are important for an artist, but they are only a beginning. My education introduced me to many different techniques, but, in the end, I was grateful that part-time students are pretty much left to their own devices.

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

I am sometimes asked. More often than not, I parry the question: “And what do you think about that?” As a basic premise, I accept a variety of interpretations, and I find it very intriguing how other people look at my works. 

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

As for people: Andrey Ushin, David Lynch, the Coen brothers, Beethoven, David Bowie, Nick Cave, Stravinsky (Oedipus Rex), Sophia Agranovich, Vladimir Propp, Irina Tokmakova, W. H. Auden, Igor Akimushkin and Aleksei Smirnov (The World of Animals and The World of Plants).  Also Stephen King, Vladimir Sorokin, Pavel Pepperstein and Sergey Anufriev. And places: Russian woods and Russian fields. 

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Graphikkabinett representative of your overall work?  Has your artistic method changed?

It’s quite representative. My approach changes from project to project, but, for me, this is a continuous process. It seems to me that everything is somehow interconnected and flows seamlessly from one project to the next. But I can’t say what it looks like to others.

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

More or less.

 

What are you working on at the moment?  Do you have any plans for the near future?

I am developing already-existing lines:  a synthesis of the animate and the inanimate in the realm of the Myth; Myth versus Logos; a depiction of the Other as it penetrates into our reality through tears in the fabric of beingness; and The Mushroom as the embodiment of the Other.

Polina Grinberg

 

Lives and works in Koblenz

 

Fine Arts at the Institute of Ceramic and Glass Art (BFA), Höhr-Grenzhausen, Germany (2017); AKI, ArtEZ Academy of Art & Design, Enschede, Netherlands (2016); Rodchenko School of Photography and Multimedia, Moscow, Russia (2010); Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia (2007).

 

 

polinagrinberg.de

 

instagram.com/artpolinagrinberg

 

bunchofquestions.com/polina_grinberg_artist

 

facebook.com/events/1044998728867178


 

 

             QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

I have been doing ceramics since 2012, and I graduated from an art school in Germany this year. Before that, I studied at the Philology Faculty of the Russian State University for the Humanities and at the Rodchenko Art School in Moscow. I have worked as a Swedish teacher and have had jobs at several publishing houses – and, to tell the truth, I never imagined that I would get involved in any sort of creative work.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist? How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

It is unlikely that anybody could explain what it takes to create, to make a good work of art, or explain where ideas actually come from, how the imagination works. The way I see it, an art school should not be a place where they tell you the way it “has to be done” and the “right way” to do it but a place where they provide an environment that is conducive to creative work and an atmosphere of psychological security and freedom. A teacher should strive to be a facilitator, which means to help students discover their potential so that they can look at things from a new perspective, so that they are not afraid to try something new, so that they are spontaneous and willing to experiment. I am sure that a formal education is not necessary to become an artist, but, at the same time, it can come in handy.

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

Quite often, actually. I used to be puzzled when it happened, but over time I’ve learnt how to do it better, I think. One thing that helps is to simply describe a work exactly the way it is. Almost like during an excursion: “Look to the right, look to the left.” Say you see a sheet of white paper, on which a couple of red blobs are pictured on the left and a big yellow spot that looks like a balloon on the right. It is surprising, but such a description can actually bring relief to a viewer: “Yes, I see that. That’s exactly what it is.” After that you can talk about associations, ideas, recollections and so on, about all sorts of things that are capable of engaging the viewer’s experience and activating their personal comprehension.

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

I’m quite skeptical about the whole concept of ‘influence’, and yet here are the things I’m enjoying at the moment. When it comes to visual art, I like Louise Bourgeois. I like reading Gertrude Stein, and I like watching Pina Bausch performances, movies by Aki Kaurismäki and the early films of Iñárritu. In photography, I am taken by William Eggleston. And I would definitely recommend climbing the Montjuïc in Barcelona to enjoy the view or getting lost in the morning fog in Latvia.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Grafikkabinett representative of your overall work? Has your artistic method changed?

All of these works have been done in the last two years. Actually, I didn’t use to draw, except during childhood. In this respect, my style can be seen in them, and also which forms, colors and materials I favor.

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

It is a great pleasure to know that my works have their own lives in different people’ homes in different countries. Over the past couple of years, I have sold a fair number of works, but, for all that, it was not my main goal – my priority was still my studies. From now on, though, I am sure my art will become one of my principle sources of income. 

 

What are you working on at the moment? Do you have any plans for the near future?

At the moment, I am making my own book. I am making up a story, and I plan to do illustrations using photos of my ceramic works. Recently, I have been reading a lot about book design, and this will give me a chance to unite my interests in story-telling, photography and ceramics.  

Ilya Grishaev

 

Lives and works in St. Petersburg and Perm

 

The Art-C Fine Arts Studio, Perm (2007); The PRO ARTE School for Young Artists (2015).

 

 

grishaevilya.tumblr.com

 

             QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist? 

From the time when I was 14, and then 21, and then 26, and then 28, and then 33.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist?  How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work? 

Everyday life is like an art school. My education and intuition go hand in hand.

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

Such situations are frequent and curious, but my works and my viewers have more to say to each other. 

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do? 

As for artists, above all, my friends, including those who are on this site. As for places, Perm and St. Petersburg. And as for texts, The Classic of Mountains and Seas or Shan Hai Jing and The Tales of Ise.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Graphikkabinett representative of your overall work? Has your artistic method changed? 

It couldn’t be more representative, and it is also an answer to the question about my method.

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist? 

Yes and no…

 

What are you working on at the moment?  Do you have any plans for the near future?

I’m completely adrift.

Mikhail Zaikanov

 

Lives and works in Moscow

 

Institute of Problems in Contemporary Art (2012-13); Rodchenko School of Photography and Multimedia, Moscow, Russia (2010-12).

 

 

os.colta.ru/art/projects/8500/details/37760/

 

artuzel.com/content/detskiy-sad-mihail-zaikanov

 

cargocollective.com/aroundart/MIKAIL-ZAIKANOV-OT-KINO-K-VIDEO-OT-VIDEO-K-OB-EKTAM-I-KOLSTAM

 

the-village.ru/village/people/people/168947-ochered-v-makdonalds

 

facebook.com/events/1391051987682679

 

facebook.com/events/768721013148057

 

 

             QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

Formally, about six or seven years ago, but I think everything that happened before that was part of the process.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist? How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

You can learn different skills and techniques, but as I see it being an artist always involves a little bit more than having certain skills. And that “little bit more” includes, among other things, intuition.

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

That happens rather often at my exhibitions. It’s okay with me :)

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

My favorite artists form a very diverse group, but they are all our contemporaries:  Viktor Pivovarov, Christian Boltanski, Anselm Kiefer, Wolfgang Tillmans, Morten Andersen, Cory Arcangel and Pawel Althamer.  Among writers who are important to me, I can mention Michelle Welbeck, Andrei Platonov, Michel Foucault, Pierre Nora, Thomas Mann (above all The Magic Mountain), Gunter Grass, Heinrich Boll and Samuel Becket. As for music, I can’t say anything clear-cut because I listen to everything from 90s pop music to minimalists to all sorts of baroque gems. Out of all the current Russian groups, I feel closest to “4 Positions of Bruno” and their projects.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Grafikkabinett representative of your overall work? Has your artistic method changed?

The selection includes different works of mine over a rather long period of time.  There is nothing that I have done all that recently, but there are, for example, my very early collages, which I have never exhibited anywhere.

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

I am able to basically provide for myself with my artwork because I also work in theaters as a video artist and set designer. If, however, this has to do with the sale of my works, that is something that happens quite rarely. 

 

What are you working on at the moment? Do you have any plans for the near future?

Over the past few years, I have been working on the topic of the memory and historical crossroads. As a framework, I have been using personal stories, including the story of my own family.  My works are usually the result of research trips to far-flung (and not so far-flung) places. My work is based on the material that I gather, or, to be more precise, it is the presence of this material that allows me to work. As for the materials, they are photographs, alabaster, paper and vellum.

Asya Marakulina

 

Lives and works in St. Petersburg

 

The St. Petersburg State University, Faculty of the Arts (2015); PRO ARTE School for Young Artists (2015)

 

 

asya-marakulina.tumblr.com

 

namegallery.ru/ru/exhibitions/view/about/40

 

arterritory.com/ru/teksti/recenzii/6261-chasoslov_asi_marakulinoj

 

aroundart.org/2015/11/26/portret-marakulina

 

aroundart.org/2017/02/13/otkry-tiya-nedeli-6-12-fevralya/#marakulina

 

art1.ru/2015/06/20/gid-po-molodomu-iskusstvu-peterburga-asya-marakulina-48807

 

avangard.rosbalt.ru/interview/asya-marakulina-vera-v-to-chto-mozhno-preobrazovat-mir-neistrebima

 

proarte.ru/events/vystavka-asi-marakulinoy-once-upon-a-map

 

spb.arttube.ru/event/vy-stavka-asi-marakulinoj-dnevnik

 

facebook.com/events/1743798585905241

 

http://journal.masters-project.ru/asya-marakulina/

 

 

 

             QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

I was around 14 years old when I began, bit by bit, to do my own works, while at the same time studying at an art school.  This was something of a diversion from the assignments and presentations I was being asked to do there. It was at around that time when I began to think of myself as an artist.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist? How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

I think it is impossible to be taught how to become an artist. It is, above all, an irresistible urge to produce, to extract something out of nothing, something devoid of any benefit and common sense. To do something it is impossible not to do. I doubt that this can be taught. I suppose that it is possible to awaken such a desire or help to channel it in the right direction by means of practical training or other. And I imagine that this is what teaching is all about. You can be taught how to do something in a skilful way, how to build a career, how to market your work, etc. My studies were very helpful; in a sense, they legitimized my involvement in art for my family and gave me time. I acquired a theoretical and a practical base, and I was also able to find a community of like-minded people. Many of the technical skills freed my imagination. But all that I do is, for the most part, intuitive.

  

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

I am often asked to do so, especially if it is something abstract. It makes me feel good when people genuinely want to understand and ask questions. But it is always difficult to explain because my works have their own language. When I have to put my works into words, I am quite likely to deprive others of the opportunity to interpret them in their own way. 

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do? 

Artists: Timur Novikov, Ivan Sotnikov, Alexander Labas, Viktor Pivovarov, Anthony Caro, Britta Marakatt-Labba, Edward Steinberg, Louise Bourgeois, Sophie Taeuber and Hans Arp, and many others.

Cinema:  The Courier, Assa, early Disney, Metropolis by Fritz Lang, Alice by Jan Švankmajer, The Games of Angels, by Walerian Borowczyk, the abstract animation of Richter and Ruttman, the films of Norman McLaren, the animated TV series Daria, the animated film The Mystery of the Third Planet, and the films of René Laloux.

Places:  Komsomolskaya Ploschad (Komsomol Square) in Perm; Mulyanka, a town in the Perm Krai; Zelyenniy Ostrov (Green Island) and the Akhtuba River in the city of Volzhski (the Volgograd Region), Korablestroiteley Street, the Smolensk River and the area around the Primorskaya Metro Station in St. Petersburg. Flights between different cities and countries. Venice. Oslo. Svalbard.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Grafikkabinett representative of your overall work? Has your artistic method changed?

In terms of the graphic works, it is entirely representative. My method is constantly changing, from one series to the next, and the selection contains practically the whole range, from etchings of cityscapes to abstract graphic images, animation frames and perforgraphics. I often display graphics as a part of an installation, and many of these drawings are elements of large three-dimensional projects. Which does not prevent them from being altogether independent works. 

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

Yes.

 

What are you working on at the moment? Do you have any plans for the near future?

I plan on going off in several directions. I am going to continue working with fabric and embroidery. Plus I want to do a series of short animations. I am also going to continue my series with maps of lakes, which I began a long time ago, and an autodidactic project about clouds.   

Jari Silomaki

 

Lives and works in Helsinki

 

Aalto University, PhD course (2013–now); University of Art and Design, Department of Photography, Helsinki (2001–2007); Turku Art Academy, Department of Photography (1997–2001); The School of Photography, Muurla (1996–1997).

 

 

www.jarisilomaki.com

 

 

 

             QUESTIONNAIRE

When did you become an artist?

I began to write poems and take pictures when I was 15 years old.

 

Is it possible to be taught how to become an artist?  How do your education and your intuition play off each other in your work?

An art education, it seems, is a direct route to becoming an artist.  I rely on my intuition, but my art training has sped up the process.

 

Do people ask you to explain what your works are about? How do you feel about that?

With any work, I am prepared to point out what the main idea is. Nothing more.

 

What artists or films or music or texts or countries or cities or places would you recommend for somebody to gain a better understanding of what you do?

I like The Umbrellas of Cherbourg by Jacques Demy.  It is a chilling, yet deeply understandable human story.  As for literature, My Struggle by Karl Ove Knausgård (Min kamp in the Norwegian original) has been an important book for me.

 

To what extent is the selection of your works that we have made for the Graphikkabinett representative of your overall work?  Has your artistic method changed?

The My Weather Diary project deals with the relationship between the individual and society, and this is a recurring theme in my works as a whole.

 

Are you able to make a living as an artist?

If you are asking whether I have become a financially successful artist, I can say that I am almost there.  Apart from my art projects, I also teach and work on the side as a photojournalist.

 

What are you working on at the moment? Do you have any plans for the near future?

At the moment, I am working on a big project, Framing the World, in which I am trying to artistically re-enact the stories from anonymous people around the world.